Towards Resilient Cities

 

The Forum focuses on the resilience of water supply, drainage and wastewater systems in cities. It is a unique opportunity to learn about the Japanese experience from the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 in recovering the functions of their water and sewerage works. The sessions also share practical experiences of several cities in the world on building resilience strategies for water supply, drainage and wastewater systems, understanding resilience as the capacity to recover after a disruptive event (disaster or crisis) or slow changes (diminishing resources, social changes, climate change). Lessons learned on how to assess and reduce the risks, and prepare for the emergency response will be shared throughout the three complementary sessions on the following topics:

  1. Lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake, The recovery of water and sewerage works
  2. Enhancing Water Security
  3. Water, Wastewater and Drainage as opportunities to enhance resilience

Session 1: Lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake, The recovery of water and sewerage works

In 2011, a magnitude-9 earthquake struck off the northeast coast of Japan, triggering a massive tsunami of up to 30 metres high, reaching up to 5 kilometers inland (UNEP, 2011). Thousands of people were killed, buildings were destroyed, and millions of tons of waste littered the country. Severe damage to water supply and sewage networks resulted in a succession of issues of service provision to citizens. In this session, we will first learn more about the context of the earthquake. Next, we will hear from leading water professionals in Japan on the emergency response of the waterworks and sewerage works services. Finally, there will be a panel discussion on the key lessons learned from the disaster recovery as take home messages on planning and adapting to disasters in the future.

The objective  is to identify

  • Lessons learned from the Japanese experience of the 2011 earthquake.
  • Highlight cultural differences that help the audience understand lessons learned, and support the exchange of experience throughout the Congress.

 

Session 2: Enhancing Water Security

The focus of this session is on ensuring resilience of water supply systems. What are the risks and how can they be absorbed by existing systems? What are ways to prepare to reduce the risks and recover rapidly after a shock? We will hear from leading water professionals on how water supply systems, integrated with other urban water services and sectors, can ensure overall resilience in cities today and in the future. Examples will be illustrated from cities in Japan, Central America, Asia, the U.S., and Europe.

The objective of the session is to learn on

  • How to Assess – what is the risk and how much can be absorbed by existing systems?
  • How to Prepare to minimize risks (Retreat /Protect /Adapt strategies) and to be ready in case of emergencies to maintain or recover rapidly the service delivery after a shock or a stress.
  • Highlight the resilience approaches of water supply systems.

 

Session 3: Water, Wastewater and Drainage as opportunities to enhance resilience

The third and last session of the Forum will broaden out on resilience strategies of the whole urban water cycle: water, wastewater and urban drainage services, and how innovative methods of integrated planning may contribute to and enhance the resilience of water services and the city as a whole. The risks to the entire urban water cycle will be considered, along with the capacity to bounce back from a disaster. A systems thinking approach will be explored, with examples from cities in Asia, Australia, and the UK.

The objective of the session is to learn on

  • How to Assess – what is the risk and how much can be absorbed by existing systems?
  • How to Prepare to minimize risks (Retreat /Protect /Adapt strategies) and to be ready in case of emergencies to maintain or recover rapidly the service delivery after a shock or a stress.
  • Highlight opportunities to enhance resilience from innovative integrated approaches to urban water management.

Get involved

*An IWA World Water Congress & Exhibition 2018 registration is compulsory for Forum attendees.

Keynote speakers

Professor MIYAJIMA Masakatsu
Kanazawa University, Faculty of Geosciences and civil Engineering, Institute of Science and Engineering

Kunihiko Onuma
Director, Water Quality Management Section, Water Purification Department, Sendai City Waterworks Bureau

ISHII Hiroyuki
Director for Sewerage Planning Coordination Sewerage and Wastewater Management Department Water and Disaster Management Bureau Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, 

Jakob Ellemann-Jensen
Minister for Environment and Food of Denmark

Aoki Hideyuki
Senior Director, Purification Division, Japan Waterworks bureau

Ikeda Masataka
Senior Director,  Planning and Coordination Division, Bureau of Sewerage

John Curtin
Executive Director of Flood and Coastal Risk Management, Environmental Agency

Professor Tony Wong
 Chief Executive Officer CRCWSC

Mark Fletcher
Arup Global water Business Leader, UK

Tsutomu SAKAGAWA
Senior Executive Director, Japan Environmental Sanitation Center (JESC)

AGENDA 

Please note that there will be simultaneous translation between Japanese and English. Arrive early to acquire your headsets for the entire forum.

Session 1 |10:30 – 12:00

Lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake – The recovery of water and sewerage works

Key speakers are Japanese, speaking in Japanese with simultaneous translation for the audience. 

Session 2 | 13:30 – 15:00

Towards Resilient Cities- Enhancing Water Security

Session 3 | 15:45-17:15

Towards Resilient Cities- Water, Wastewater and Drainage as opportunities to enhance resilience

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